COSTS OF OBESITY

Social, Emotional And Financial Costs Of Obesity

Q: What is the mortality rate associated with obesity?

A: Most studies show an increase in mortality rates associated with obesity. Individuals who are obese have a significantly increased risk of death from all causes, compared with healthy weight individuals (BMI 18.5 to 24.9).

  1. The increased risk varies by cause of death, and most of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular causes.

  2. Obesity is associated with over 112,000 excess deaths due to cardiovascular disease, over 15,000 excess deaths due to cancer, and over 35,000 excess deaths due to non-cancer, non-cardiovascular disease causes per year in the U.S. population, relative to healthy-weight individuals.  (Data based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2003–2006 and 2007–2008.)
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Q: How has the prevalence of overweight and obese adults changed over the years?

A: The prevalence of excess weight and obesity in adults has steadily increased among both genders, all ages, all racial/ethnic groups, all educational levels, and all smoking levels.

  1.   From 1960 to 2006, the prevalence of obesity increased from 13.4 to 35.1 percent in U.S. adults age 20 to 74.

  2. Since 2004, the prevalence of overweight adult Americans continues to increase among both men and women.

  3. More than 50% of the population in several states could be obese by 2018: Oklahoma, Mississippi, Maryland, Kentucky, Ohio and South Dakota.

  4.    If the obesity rate continues to rise until 2018, then Colorado may be the only state with less than 30% of residents who are obese.
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Economic Costs Related to Obesity

As the number of overweight and obese adults has increased in the United States, so have related health care costs.

Q: What is the cost of obesity?

A: Overall, the United States spends about $1.8 trillion a year in medical costs associated with chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer, and all three are linked to smoking and obesity, the nation's two largest risk factors, according to the America's Health Rankings report.

  1. If the percentage of obese adults doesn't change but stays at the current rate of 34%, then excess weight will cost the nation about $198 billion by 2018.

  2. On average, people who are considered obese pay $1,429 (42 percent) more in annual out-of-pocket health care costs than individuals of normal weight.

  3. An obese person will have an average of $8,315 in medical bills a year in 2018 compared with $5,855 for an adult at a healthy weight. That's a difference of $2,460 (Pre 2010 Healthcare Law figures).

  4. There is a growing body of evidence documenting obesity's impact on medical costs. A study released in July, 2009 showed that obese Americans cost the country about $147 billion in weight-related medical bills in 2008 - double what it was just 10 years ago.  It now accounts for about 9.1% of medical spending.
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Q: What is the cost of obesity by insurance status?

A:  For each obese beneficiary:

  1. Medicare pays $1,723 more than it pays for normal-weight beneficiaries.  

  2. Medicaid pays $1,021 more than it pays for normal-weight beneficiaries.

  3.   Private insurers pay $1,140 more than they pay for normal-weight beneficiaries.
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Q: What is the cost of obesity by the type of service provided?

A:  For each obese patient:

  1.   Medicare pays $95 more for an inpatient service, $693 more for a non-inpatient service, and $608 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients.

  2.   Medicaid pays $213 more for an inpatient service,$175 more for a non-inpatient service, and $230 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients.

  3.   Private insurers pay $443 more for inpatient service, $398 more for non-inpatient service, and $284 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients. 
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Other Statistics Related to Obesity

Q: How physically active is the U.S. population?

A: Only 31 percent of U.S. adults report that they engage in regular leisure-time physical activity (defined as either three sessions per week of vigorous physical activity lasting 20 minutes or more, or five sessions per week of light-to-moderate physical activity lasting 30 minutes or more). About 40 percent of adults report no leisure-time physical activity.

  1. About 35 percent of high school students report that they participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity on 5 or more days of the week, and only 30 percent of students report that they attend physical education class daily. As children get older, participation in regular physical activity decreases dramatically.[13]

  2. In contrast to reported activity, when physical activity is measured by a device that detects movement, only about 3–5 percent of adults obtain 30 minutes of moderate or greater intensity physical activity on at least 5 days per week. 
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Q: What are the benefits of physical activity?

A: Research suggests that physical activity may reduce the risk of many adverse health conditions, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, some cancers, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression.

  1. In addition, physical activity can help reduce risk factors for conditions such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol.

  2. Researchers believe that some physical activity is better than none, and additional health benefits can be gained by increasing the frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activity. 
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Questions & Answers About The Costs Of Obesity

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Costs Of Obseity

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