DIETARY GUIDELINES

Senior Nutrition Information

What Counts As A Serving Size?


Below are approximate amounts that count as one serving.

Milk, Yogurt and Cheese

•1 cup of milk or yogurt

•1 1/2 ounces of natural cheese

•2 ounces of process cheese


Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs and Nuts

•2-3 ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish

•1/2 cup of cooked dry beans, 1 egg, or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter count as 1 ounce of lean meat


Vegetables

•1 cup of raw leafy vegetables

•1/2 cup of other vegetables cooked or chopped raw

•3/4 cup of vegetable juice


Fruits

•1 medium apple, banana, orange

•1/2 cup of chopped, cooked, or canned fruit

•3/4 cup of fruit juice


Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta

•1 slice of bread

•1 ounce of ready-to-eat cereal

•1/2 cup of cooked cereal, rice, or pasta


Fats, Oils and Sugars and Sweets

No specific serving size is given for the use of fats, oils, and sweets group because they should be used only sparingly and consumption should be very limited.

Try to meet all the recommended serving size amounts listed above. Your body needs them for the vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, and protein they supply.
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USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005

The USDA’s Dietary Guidelines For Americans offers science-based advice on food and physical activity choices that promote good health. The U.S.Department of Agriculture has not yet published The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. 

What is a Healthy Diet?


The Dietary Guidelines describe a healthy diet as one that:

•Emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products;

•Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts; and

•Is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
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1.  One size doesn't fit all

USDA's new MyPyramid represents a personalized approach to healthy eating and physical activity. It has been developed to remind consumers to make healthy food choices and to be active every day.

2.  Physical Activity + Good Nutrition = Healthy Living

Along with the importance healthy eating, Americans need to be reminded the importance - and need for - daily physical activity and exercise.

3.  Moderation Is A Must

Moderation in eating and the selection of foods with little or no solid fats or added sugars is emphasized. The USDA suggests that  foods containing more added sugars and solid fats can fit into your diet (in moderation) but you need to increase your physical activity and exercise to compensate for it as well.

4.  Portion and Proportionality are Key

The widths of the different food bands on the FoodPyramid suggest how much food a person should choose from each group. The widths are just a general guide, not exact proportions. Check the Web site for how much is right for you.

5.  Eat A Variety Of The Right Foods

Variety in what you eat from the different food groups is important; and foods from all groups are needed each day for good health.  Still, it is the amount of food from each group and its proportion as part of the whole that is important for each individual when determining how much is right for them.

6.  Little Changes Over Time Deliver Big Results

Individuals can benefit from taking small steps to improve their diet and lifestyle each day.  Remember, the Food Pyramid is not a rigid prescription, but a valuable reference to help you eat healthy and increase the quality of your life.

6 Steps To Healthier Eating

See below for examples of appropriate portion and serving sizes.

The 2005 dietary guideline remain the current guidance until the new 2010 Dietary Guidelines are published.

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Dietary Guidelines and Senior Nutrition

The content on AsYouAge.com is provided as a courtesy for our site visitors. The information, resources, links, advertisements and other material on AsYouAge does not constitute a professional opinion or advice; nor does it constitute an endorsement of any organization or the information, products and/or services they may offer.

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