HEALTHY WHOLE GRAINS

How Whole Grains Help Your Body

Tips From The USDA MyPyramid                             To Help Increase Whole Grains In Your Diet


Eat More Whole Grains At Meals:


  1. To eat more whole grains, substitute a whole-grain product for a refined product – such as eating whole-wheat bread instead of white bread or brown rice instead of white rice. It’s important to substitute the whole-grain product for the refined one, rather than adding the whole-grain product.


  1. For a change, try brown rice or whole-wheat pasta. Try brown rice stuffing in baked green peppers or tomatoes and whole-wheat macaroni in macaroni and cheese.


  1. Use whole grains in mixed dishes, such as barley in vegetable soup or stews and bulgur wheat in casserole or stir-fries.


  1. Create a whole grain pilaf with a mixture of barley, wild rice, brown rice, broth and spices. For a special touch, stir in toasted nuts or chopped dried fruit.


  1. Experiment by substituting whole wheat or oat flour for up to half of the flour in pancake, waffle, muffin or other flour-based recipes. They may need a bit more leavening.


  1. Use whole-grain bread or cracker crumbs in meatloaf.


  1. Try rolled oats or a crushed, unsweetened whole grain cereal as breading for baked chicken, fish, veal cutlets, or eggplant parmesan.


  1. Try an unsweetened, whole grain ready-to-eat cereal as croutons in salad or in place of crackers with soup.


  1. Freeze leftover cooked brown rice, bulgur, or barley. Heat and serve it later as a quick side dish.
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Eat More Whole Grains As Snacks:


  1. Snack on ready-to-eat, whole grain cereals such as toasted oat cereal.


  1. Add whole-grain flour or oatmeal when making cookies or other baked treats.


  1. Try a whole-grain snack chip, such as baked tortilla chips.



  1. Even popcorn, a whole grain, can be a healthy snack with little or no added salt and butter.
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Increase Your Whole Grain Intake

By Reading Your Food Labels


  1.   Choose foods that name one of the following whole-grain ingredients first on the label’s ingredient list:



“brown rice”



“bulgur”



“graham flour”



“oatmeal”



“whole-grain corn”



“whole oats”



“whole rye”



“whole wheat”



“wild rice”


  1. Foods labels with the words “multi-grain,” “stone-ground,”     “100% wheat,” “cracked wheat,” “seven-grain,” or “bran” are usually not whole-grain products.

  2.                             

  3. Color is not an indication of a whole grain. Bread can be brown because of molasses or other added ingredients. Read the ingredient list to see if it is a whole grain.


  4. Use the Nutrition Facts label and choose products with a higher

  5.         percentage Daily Value (%DV) for fiber – the %DV for fiber is a good clue to the amount of whole grain in the product.


  6. Read the food label’s ingredient list. Look for terms that indicate   

  7.         added sugars (sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and

  8.         molasses) and oils (partially hydrogenated vegetable oils) that

  9.         add extra calories. Choose foods with fewer added sugars,

  10.         fats, or oils.


  1. Most sodium in the food supply comes from packaged foods.

  2.         Similar packaged foods can vary widely in sodium content,

  3.         including breads.  Use the Nutrition Facts label to choose

  4.         foods with a lower % DV for sodium.                                    


  5. Foods with less than 140 mg sodium per serving can be

  6.         labeled as low sodium foods. Claims such as “low in

  7.         sodium” or “very low in sodium” on the front of the food

  8.         label can help you identify foods that contain less salt (or

  9.         sodium).

Whole Grain Granola Bars

Whole Grain Snack Mixes

Whole Grain Snack Mixes

Made At Home

The Nutrition Facts Label on the back of a package of food tells you more about nutritional facts and actual ingredients than the marketing words and phrases on the front of the package.

For Commercially Produced & Packaged Foods,

The Information Required By Law On The Back

Is More Important Than What Is On The Front

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Healthy Whole Grains

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