WORK & FAMILY CAREGIVING

A BALANCING ACT FOR CAREGIVERS

Observations from the University of Pittsburgh                         Institute On Aging

When the need for caregiving occurs, finances become an growing concern - along with balancing caregiving and work obligations in order to avoid reductions in pay or loss of possible advancement.

  1.   Caring for a loved one, especially for a spouse or parent with chronic and/or debilitating disease, often presents needs that conflict with the ability to work.

  2.    Providing for basic transportation, accompanying the person to doctors’ appointments, administering care, and meeting specific health care regimens often result in the need for caregivers to take time off from work, sometimes without pay.

  3.      And if caregivers do not manage their stress well, they are likely to get sick themselves, resulting in additional time off work.

To help offset the reduced productivity, increased need to be absent from work, and the physical and emotional health problems experienced by employees who serves as a caregivers, many employers have begun to offer assistance for caregivers who work.

Work and Family Caregiving                             Balancing Caregiving and Work Responsibilities

A 2008 Prudential Insurance Company study about working caregivers and related costs reveals two significant findings:

1. At-home care provided to people age 50 or older cost family caregivers an average of $5,531 in non-reimbursed out-of-pocket expenses.

2. The amount of out-of-pocket expenses for family caregivers increases to more than $8,000 if the caregiver lives a long distance from the person receiving care.

In addition, studies indicate that

  1. One in every two U.S. workers has some experience (directly or indirectly) with long-term caregiving (also called custodial care). 

  2. More than 17% of workers have personally provided or currently are providing caregiving for a senior family member or relative for an extended period of time. 

  3. When workers are providing or managing care for a family member, it can result in more frequent absences (for the worker’s personal  health needs as well as because of direct or indirect caregiving-related activities).

  4. At least 67% of employee absences reported are for reasons other than an worker illness; and one of the top reasons for employee absence is to care for the needs of an aging relative or friend.

  5. Of the 17% of U.S. workers who take on family caregiving and management responsibilities for their aging parents or relatives

  6. 20% say it greatly impacts their attendance at work

  7. 20% say it greatly impacts their work performance

  8. 21% say it moderately impacts their attendance at work

  9. 16% say it has a moderate impact on their work performance 
    http://www.AsYouAge.com/
 

Employer Assistance Options                                                         For Family Caregivers

Recognizing the demand that the growing aging population places on employees, an increasing number of employers provide policies and programs to support families and caregivers.

Employer policies may include accommodations such as:

•Paid sick leave to care for a parent (usually limited in the total number of days allowed)

•Unpaid leave for up to 12 weeks/year through the Family and Medical Leave Act

•Flex-time policies (allowing negotiation in the times of starting and finishing work or allowing increases in hours worked to reduce the number of days worked)

•Options to work from the home

•Job sharing (splitting a full-time job between two individuals to allow more time off but provide full-time coverage of the job)

•Leave sharing (allowing coworkers to donate time off for their colleagues use)

•Shift exchanging (allowing employees to exchange shifts)

•Funeral leave

•Bereavement leave

•Employee assistance programs (free, confidential counseling and assistance with personal and professional matters that may interfere with job performance or personal satisfaction)


Ask your Human Resources Department if your company has policies or benefits that might of help to you as a caregiver. 
http://www.AsYouAge.com/
 

AsYouAge.com  Provides Free, Reliable Senior Information and Resources

The content on AsYouAge.com is provided as a courtesy for our site visitors. The information, resources, links, advertisements and other material on AsYouAge does not constitute a professional opinion or advice; nor does it constitute an endorsement of any organization or the information, products and/or services they may offer. AsYouAge reviews and updates its content regularly when new and relevant information is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional advice in any area: health, medical, legal, insurance, financial or any other area. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified health provider, or caregiver, attorney, financial, insurance expert or other specialist prior to starting, dropping or changing your current program or have questions or concerns  regarding current or anticipated issues.


www. AsYouAge.com       

Copyright 2009 - 2013.  All Rights Reserved.

As You Age

Work and Family Caregiving

The content on AsYouAge.com is provided as a courtesy for our site visitors. The information, resources, links, advertisements and other material on AsYouAge does not constitute a professional opinion or advice; nor does it constitute an endorsement of any organization or the information, products and/or services they may offer.

 Join Our Care Provider NetworkSign_Up_Provider_Network_Directory_and_Provider_Referrals.html

AsYouAge.com is a directory of Senior information and Senior resources for in-home care, healthcare, senior housing, Social Security, Medicare, Veterans benefits, elderlaw, nutrition, fitness, travel, finance, medical symptoms, consumer protection, senior  care, caregiving and more. www.AsYouAge.com